Categories
Short Story Sunday

Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?: Sunday Short Story Review

Author: Joyce Carol Oates
Release Date: 1966
Genres: General Fiction, Thriller
Themes: Loss of Innocence, Feminism, Sexuality, Violence
Word Count: 7000 words, 9 pages

Read It Here

Synopsis

This twisted short story follows 15 year old white girl, Connie. Connie believes she’s pretty, is confident in the way she dresses and walks, and like any other fifteen year old, in midst of an adolescent rebellion. Three pages in, after a morning of laying in the sun, there’s a man, or a figure, or a spirit, outside trying to lure her. Connie has to make the decision to follow or to risk it all. In this 9 page short story, Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? is direct in telling a story and indirect in interpreting it.

Spoilers Without Context





Quotes

Connie couldn’t do a thing, her mind was all filled with trashy daydreams.

But all the boys fell back and dissolved into a single face that was not even a face but an idea, a feeling, mixed up with the urgent insistent pounding of the music and the humid night of July

Follow the next page for a spoiler, in-depth review.

Categories
Book Recommendations Reading Tips & Tricks

The Ultimate Readers Guide to Quarantine

Everyone around the world is forced to be at home and practice social distancing. Now that we are forced to to stay home, we should take advantage of this time to read, create, and relax. Below I have my list of ideas to kill the boredom, read more books, create book marks and book covers, and most importantly, multiple ways to challenge your mind.

Categories
Book Recommendations book review

The Old Man and the Sea | Book Review: A Perfect Escapism Novella For Quarantine

Author: Ernest Hemingway

Release Date: September 1, 1952

Page count:127

Genres: Fiction, Novella, Allegory

Themes: Defeat, Death, Pride

My Rating:★★★★★

Where to Buy This Book:

Categories
Book Club Book Recommendations book review

The Bluest Eye | Book Review

Author: Toni Morrison

Release Date: 1970

Page count: 206

Genres: Fiction, African American Literature

Themes: Beauty, Whiteness, Seeing vs. Being Seen, Sexual abuse

My Rating:★★★★★

Where to buy this book:

I read this book as part of my book club pick for the month, and I do not regret choosing this book for the month of March. This book has everything one can hope for: wit, humor, beauty, tragedy, and imagination.

Synopsis

This book focuses on the story of Pecola during the Great Depression. Pecola is a young black girl who has an abusive father and a mother who finds comfort in her job of caring for a white home. Pecola is often mocked for her dark skin and prays for blond hair and blue eyes. In this novel, you read the story of Pecola when she was taken care by another family, learn the backstory of Pecola’s parents, and ultimately, the meaning of beauty, race, and class. 

Categories
Reading Tips & Tricks

Is It Important to Read Criticism About a Book?

This is a question that I’m thinking to myself as I’m reading what others have to say about American Dirt. Many book reviewers are choosing to silence the criticism and read the book, and conclude their own thoughts.

Categories
book review

I Read American Dirt So That You Dont Have To |Book Review

Author: Jeanine Cummins
Publish Date: January 21, 2020
Pages: 400
Genres: Hispanic American Literature, Thriller, Psychological Thriller
Themes: On the run, family bonds, trust, money as the root of all evil
My Rating:★★☆☆☆

Where to buy this book:

You may know about this book because it’s being widespread as we speak, or because of it’s heavy criticism that it’s been receiving. In this book review, I’m going to address all the goods and bads about the book.

Now, I hardly ever read new releases. I usually wait a few weeks until a book has been reviewed and then I usually pick it up. This time around, I will say that I was well aware of this book hitting the shelves when I was researching books being published in 2020 and I immediately wanted to read it. I was interested in the book of because of how it was marketed. The promo had Stephen King blurbed saying it was, “An extraordinary piece of work, a perfect balancing act with terror on one side and love on the other.” Also, Sandra Cisneros, author of The House on Mango Street said, “This book is not simply the great American novel; It’s the great novel of Las Amricas.” After reading those two comments, I was hooked. The marketing did it’s job of being interesting to read about. As a Mexican American citizen, these stories of migrants crossing to America is all my family and I talk about. But then I read this book and realized, this book relies heavily on stereotypes and does not, whatsoever reflect today’s migrant story.

Table of contents:
Page 1: Spoil free book review
Page 2: Spoiled, detailed book review
Page 3: Addressing the controversy

Categories
Book Club

March’s Book Club Pick: The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

Page count: 206
Publication Date: 1970
Genre: Fiction, Classic American Literature, African American Literature

I’m so excited to announce this book as the book club pick for March. March is women’s empowerment month, and I wanted to choose a book that fully encompasses that.