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book review

The Devil Wears Prada: The Movie Was Better Than The Book | Book vs. Movie Review

Spoiler Free Book Review

Designer: Lauren Weisberger

Release Season: April 22, 2003

Thread count: 401 pages

Category: Contemporary Fiction, Chick-Lit

Textiles Themes: Capitalism, Leadership, Beauty Is Pain

My Rating: ★★★.5☆☆

Buy This Book Fresh Out Of The Runway Here:

Today’s Fashion Show Table of Contents:
Page 1: Spoiler Free Book Review
Page 2: Spoiler Book Review
Page 3: Movie vs. Book Review (Contains Spoilers)

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book review

Along Came a Spider: A Good Story But A Tough Read | Book Review

Spoiler Free

Author: James Patterson
Release Date: February 1993
Page count: 464
Genres: Murder Mystery, Thriller
Themes: Trust, Sociopaths
My Rating:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Where To Buy This Book:

Synopsis

In the first book of Alex Cross mystery series, Alex is a homicide detective with a PhD in Psychology given the case of finding the whereabouts of two kids who were kidnapped by a teacher from their private school, and not the case about a family of three who were murdered in their apartment in the ghettos of Washington D.C. In this book you follow the acts of a sociopath who kills to be remembered, and get inside the mind of Alex Cross as he desperately wants to solve the case. Full of action, this book may be predictable, but still fresh in it’s story.

Synopsis by the publisher

Discover the classic thriller that launched the #1 detective series of the past twenty-five years, now one of PBS’s “100 Great American Reads”

Alex Cross is a homicide detective with a Ph.D. in psychology. He works and lives in the ghettos of D. C. and looks like Muhammad Ali in his prime. He’s a tough guy from a tough part of town who wears Harris Tweed jackets and likes to relax by banging out Gershwin tunes on his baby grand piano. But he also has two adorable kids of his own, and they are his own special vulnerabilities.

Jezzie Flanagan is the first woman ever to hold the highly sensitive job as supervisor of the Secret Service in Washington. Blond, mysterious, seductive, she’s got an outer shell that’s as tough as it is beautiful. She rides her black BMW motorcycle at speeds of no less than 100 mph. What is she running from? What is her secret?

Alex Cross and Jezzie Flanagan are about to have a forbidden love affair-at the worst possible time for both of them. Because Gary Soneji, who wants to commit the “crime of the century,” is playing at the top of his game. Soneji has outsmarted the FBI, the Secret Service, and the police. Who will be his next victim?

Gary Soneji is every parent’s worst nightmare. He has become Alex Cross’s nightmare. And now, reader, he’s about to become yours.

Spoilers without context


Do I recommend this book?

I recommend this book for readers who are in the mood for a murder mystery with blood and a psychotic sociopath antagonist. James Patterson’s writing style is known for being colloquial without the adjectives and descriptions, with short chapters, full of action and dialogue, but no character development.

If you’ve read James Patterson, this is just another James Patterson book. This is my fourth James Patterson book and it seems like every book of his has a pattern. Murder, a detective who looks for the murders, the detective hook-ups with their partner, and they solve the case. 

If you want to read a murder mystery with distinct characters, a plot line, and rich descriptions, you are not going to get that in this book. The main character has little to no character development, and as a seasoned reader, this book could be predictable at times. In my opinion, there are better murder mysteries out there in the world.

Things to consider before you choose to read the book:

  1. There is explicit language such as sex scenes, graphic scenes with blood, and curse words. 
  2. The antagonist in this book is literally insane. He would kill anybody in it’s way no matter their sex, gender, or race As a reader, I felt like there were times when James Patterson was trying to humanize the murder. You decide whether that’s a good or bad thing. 
  3. This book is a bit long. Despite the fact that it’s fast pace with short chapters, the story may seem like it’s dragged along.
  4. The main character, Alex Cross, is black and there are critiques of readers and critics who question the portrayal of Alex Cross. For me, it did feel like I was reading another white guy and the only moments when I was reminded that Alex Cross was black was when he was in his neighborhood in D.C., because James Patterson explicitly writes about his black neighborhood, or when James Patterson made it clear to remind the reader that he was black in one form or another. 

Favorite Quotes:

It’s all right to put the weight of the world on your shoulders sometimes, if you know how to take it off. 

All of us shrinks talk about VFC when we get together. Very fucking crazy, Gerry.” 

Follow the next page for an in-depth, spoiler book review. Beware for spoilers!!!

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Book Club book review

Wuthering Heights: Gothic Literature At It’s Best | Book Review

Spoiler free

Author: Emily Brontë Release Date: 1847
Page count: 400
Genres: Gothic Literature, Classic
Themes: Vegnance, Romance, Prejudice
My Rating:

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Where To Buy This Book

Helpful Links & Tips

Meet All 19 Characters of Wuthering Heights (Spoiler Free). This post was very helpful to identify the character during my reading journey. As I was reading the book, all of the characters and the children of the main characters got mixed together, so it was nice that I had it all organized in one post.

How Carole Baskin and Heathcliff are Both Murders. I had so much fun writing this heavily sarcastic conspiracy theory.

Wuthering Heights Fuled Into Pop Culture. This is a very interesting post on how Wuthering Heights has been brought into pop culture today. 

Synopsis

Literature’s equivalency to Disney’s Maleficent, Wuthering Heights sheds a light into the dark tunnel of Heathcliff. One of literary’s epic villain, Heathcliff intense and wild obsession for Catherine Earnshaw turns into a revenge onto Catherine’s family and her husbands, Edgar Lintons family. Full of dark imagery, characters who come out the page, and a story of how dangerous love can be, this book is a classic love story like no other. 

Synopsis by the publisher

Wuthering Heights is a novel by Emily Brontë, written between October 1845 and June 1846, and published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell. It was her first and only published novel: she died aged 30 the following year. The decision to publish came after the success of her sister Charlotte’s novel, Jane Eyre. After Emily’s death, Charlotte edited the manuscript of Wuthering Heights, and arranged for the edited version to be published as a posthumous second edition in 1850. Wuthering Heights is the name of the farmhouse on the Yorkshire moors where the story unfolds. The book’s core theme is the destructive effect that jealousy and vengefulness have, both on the jealous or vengeful individuals and on their communities. Although Wuthering Heights is now widely regarded as a classic of English literature, it received mixed reviews when first published, and was considered controversial because its depiction of mental and physical cruelty was so unusually stark. In the second half of the 19th century, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre was considered the best of the Brontë sisters’ works, but later critics argued that Wuthering Heights was superior. Wuthering Heights has inspired adaptations, including film, radio and television dramatisations, a musical by Bernard J. Taylor, a ballet, operas (by Bernard Herrmann, Carlisle Floyd, and Frédéric Chaslin), a role-playing game, and a 1978 song by Kate Bush.

Do you recommend this book? Should I read this book?

If you are a huge fan of romance, tragedies, and gothic literature, this book is a must. Wuthering Heights has been known to inspire many romance novels, tv shows, and movies. 

But this book isn’t for everyone. You either love it or you hate it. Many people hate this book because of Heathcliff. Heathcliff is a dark character who has many flaws and enemies. It’s also important to note that in this book, Heathcliff has a past, and one of the beauties of this book is that it tells the reader about Heathcliff. He’s one of those characters that no matter how destructive he can be, it’s nearly impossible to turn away. 

I would read 50 pages of this book, and if you don’t like it, then you can put it away. 

Which Edition Should I Read?

My recommendation is the Norton edition, linked above. The Norton edition has introduction essays, definitions to vocabulary and phrases, and translations. Especially since this book uses old english, this edition really makes it worth your buck.

If you don’t mind the old English, and you think you got it, any edition works! Just remember that this book is in the public domain, meaning it’s free to read and to print and reproduce, so if any edition is charging you too much, they are scamming you. 

Things to consider before you choose to read the book:

  1. This book uses old English.
  2. This does show dark elements of animal cruelty, mental and physical abuse, and bullying. 
  3. This book is narrated by more than one author so it may confuse the reader. 
  4. The book moves back and forth in time. 

Favorite Quotes:

Do you mark those two lines between your eyes; and those thick brows, that, instead of rising arched, sink in the middle; and that couple of black fiends, so deeply buried, who never open their windows boldly, but lurk glinting under them, like devil’s spies?

Only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! . . . It is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul

I’m tired of being enclosed here. I’m wearying to escape into that glorious world, and to be always there: not seeing it dimly through tears, and yearning for it through the walls of an aching heart: but really with it, and in it.

Follow the next page for an in-depth, spoiler book review. 

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book review

Turtles All The Way Down: John Green’s Next Best Book | Book Review

Spoiler Free Book Review

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Author: John Green
Release Date: October 10, 2017
Page count: 286
Genres: Young Adult Contemporary, Mystery, Romance
Themes: Mental Illness, Relationships, Friendships, Class, Love

My Rating:

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Where to buy this book:

I finally read Turtles All The Way Down! I bought this book right when this book was released three years ago, but never read it. I loved John Green’s books, but I was scared that this was going to be a let down. Fast forward today, in quarantine, in the mood to read a YA romance novel, I decided it was finally time, and I’m glad I picked it up. If I would of known this book was about mental illness, and anxiety, I would of read this a long time ago. This book made laugh, be on the edge of my seat, and at the end, I cried. This book will forever stick with me. John Green did it again. 

Synopsis

Turtles All The Way Down tells the story of Aza, a junior in high school who suffers with anxiety and OCD. While in high school,  local billionaire fugitive has disappearance before his prosecution for. Information to his disappearance has a reward of $100,000. Aza doesn’t know the billionaire, but she knows his son Davis. Aza and her best friend, Daisy, become money hungry and decide to solve the mystery for their college funds. Not only is this a mystery novel, through the book you learn about the meaning of friendships and relationships, but most importantly, we learn about anxiety and how to deal with your spiral thoughts in life. As Robert Frost says, “In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on.”

Synopsis by the publisher

It all begins with a fugitive billionaire and the promise of a cash reward. Turtles All the Way Down is about lifelong friendship, the intimacy of an unexpected reunion, Star Wars fan fiction, and tuatara. But at its heart is Aza Holmes, a young woman navigating daily existence within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.

In his long-awaited return, John Green shares Aza’s story with shattering, unflinching clarity.

Fan art:

Spoilers Without Context

Do I recommend this book? Is it better than Fault in Our Stars?

Question #1: Yes! This book shows Aza dealing her anxiety and how her thoughts make her spiral. If you suffer from anxiety, or knows someone who does, this is the book for you. What I loved about this book is that it suggests that anxiety isn’t something that is solved, but it shows how to cope with it. 

Question #2: That question is up to reader. Did you love Fault in Our Stars? Then you’ll love this book. I can only speak from my personal opinion, and as a fan of John Green’s books (except An Abundance of Katherines and Will Grayson, Will Grayson), this book what all I could ask for. It was full of metaphors, mentions great literature writers such as Robert Frost and Emily Dickinson, has quirky love scenes, talks about teenage things, and treats the young adults in the novel as adults. And the end, it made me cry. I totally had a moment of sadness after reading the book. When I finished it, I was speechless, and fell into a spiral for a gratification for this book. But will this book crush your heart like The Fault in Our Stars? I don’t think so. This book may seem sad, but it’s uplifting, and for that, I appreciate it more than The Fault of In Our Stars.

Things to consider before you choose to read the book:

  1. It heavily discusses mental illnesses. The book goes into heavy detail of what a mental spiral is, OCD, and how it effects others. It’s a heavy topic to read about, but it’s an important one. It’s important that we highlight and discuss these issues to make connections, and raise awareness of what it’s like to have a mental illness.
  2. Not only does this book talk about mental illness, but it also discusses what class is like today. John Green talks about high class, and the many types of middle class. Something I haven’t read in Young Adult literature today. 
  3. This is book also includes text messages, blog posts, and poems. As a sucker for literature, I appreciated the references. 
  4. Many metaphors on the quintessential meaning of life. Just like John Green’s previous books, he writes about the big question of what is life. 

Favorite Quotes:

Anybody can look at you. It’s quite rare to find someone who sees the same world you see.

You’re both the fire and the water that extinguishes it. You’re the narrator, the protagonist, and the sidekick. You’re the storyteller and the story told. You are somebody’s something, but you are also your you.

The thing about a spiral is, if you follow it inward, it never actually ends. It just keeps tightening, infinitely.

Follow the next page for an in-depth, spoiler book review.

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WARNING: YOU WILL BE SPOILED! AND TRUST ME, YOU WILL NOT WANNA BE SPOILED.

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book review

The Apartment | Book Review

Spoiler Free

I received this copy from NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. Since this book is a rough edit, I’m not allowed to use direct quotes. This book will hit the shelves April 28, 2020!

Author: K.L. Slater
Release Date: April 28, 2020
Page count: 269
Genres: Psychological Thriller, Crime Thriller
Themes: Trust, Love, Paranoia 

My Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Where To Buy:

Synopsis

This book is about a recently widowed mother, Freya, and her daughter Skye, moving into an apartment that is too good to be true. Freya has nothing to loose and moves-in with her daughter when all of the sudden she hears voices, objects move around the room, and cannot get any rest. It doesn’t help either how she hears bad reputation about the Adder House from past tennants, and neighbors. In this psychological thriller you dive into this The Adams Family kind of tale where you can’t trust anybody. 

Synopsis by the publisher

It’s an opportunity she can’t refuse. The woman before her tried…

Freya Miller needs a miracle. In the fallout of her husband’s betrayal, she’s about to lose her family home, and with it the security she craves for her five-year-old daughter, Skye. Adrift and alone, she’s on the verge of despair until a chance meeting with the charismatic Dr Marsden changes everything. He’s seeking a new tenant for a shockingly affordable flat in a fashionable area of London.

Adder House sounds too good to be true… But Freya really can’t afford to be cynical, and Dr Marsden is adamant she and Skye will be a perfect fit with the other residents.

But Adder House has secrets. Even behind a locked front door, Freya feels as if she’s being watched: objects moving, unfamiliar smells, the blinking light of a concealed camera… and it’s not long before she begins to suspect that her dream home is hiding a nightmarish reality. Was it really chance that led her here—or something unthinkably dark?

As the truth about Adder House starts to unravel, can Freya and Skye get out—or will they be locked in forever?

Spoilers without context: 

Do I recommend this book?

I recommend this book for readers who looking for a fast read. If you read many genres and you want to dive back into a thriller, this is a great start. It’s short, tells a story, keeps you questioning, what the hell is going on. 

I probably wouldn’t recommend this to a die-hard thriller reader. Yes this book is thrilling, but it’s under 300 pages long, and only so much can happen in that short amount of time. For thriller readers, this book is like a sampler to main course. 

Things to consider before you choose to read the book:

  1. It’s a short read. You could finish it one sitting if you’d like. Just make sure you have your next read planned out before you finish it.
  2. It’s a British text. They use single quotations. As an American reader I was bothered by for the first few pages, but after that I was quickly able to transition. 
  3. There will be a few chapters that sound confusing, but it will all make sense in the end. Just push through and read about the story.
  4. The ending is a bit rushed. For those who don’t like rushed endings, this isn’t the tale for you, but in my opinion, the pay off is great.

What I liked about the book:

I liked how the author was able to bring Freya out of the page. The last book I read that had a mother protagonist was American Dirt, and that was a mess. In this book, I was fully able to understand Freya’s motives. 

What I most enjoyed about this book was all the questions that arose while reading the book. Questions like, what the heck is happening? Why her? Don’t you miss him? Could it be this or that? And at the end, all of those questions where answered. It was a satisfying feeling. It felt like I was building puzzle pieces as I was reading the book, and at the end all of those pieces were put together, showing an ending I’ve never read in a book. Maybe there are other books similar to this book, but I hardly read thrillers so I wouldn’t know. But the question of whether this book is fresh or not, nothing takes away the fun I had reading this book, and for that, I appreciate it.

What I didn’t like about the book:

 I didn’t like how this book didn’t feel British. I was in the mood to read a British novel and that feeling didn’t get fulfilled. It did have subtle British notes in the book, but not what I was looking for. 

Will I read more books by this author?

Yes! I loved how even though this book was a short read, I was able to immerse myself into the book and be entertained. 

Do I recommend this book?

I recommend this book for readers who looking for a fast read. If you read many genres and you want to dive back into a thriller, this is a great start. It’s short, tells a story, keeps you questioning, what the hell is going on. 

I probably wouldn’t recommend this to a die-hard thriller reader. Yes this book is thrilling, but it’s under 300 pages long, and only so much can happen in that short amount of time. For thriller readers, this book is like a sampler to main course. 

Things to consider before you choose to read the book:

  1. It’s a short read. You could finish it one sitting if you’d like. Just make sure you have your next read planned out before you finish it.
  2. It’s a British text. They use single quotations. As an American reader I was bothered by for the first few pages, but after that I was quickly able to transition. 
  3. There will be a few chapters that sound confusing, but it will all make sense in the end. Just push through and read about the story.
  4. The ending is a bit rushed. For those who don’t like rushed endings, this isn’t the tale for you, but in my opinion, the pay off is great.

What I liked about the book:

I liked how the author was able to bring Freya out of the page. The last book I read that had a mother protagonist was American Dirt, and that was a mess. In this book, I was fully able to understand Freya’s motives. 

What I most enjoyed about this book was all the questions that arose while reading the book. Questions like, what the heck is happening? Why her? Don’t you miss him? Could it be this or that? And at the end, all of those questions where answered. It was a satisfying feeling. It felt like I was building puzzle pieces as I was reading the book, and at the end all of those pieces were put together, showing an ending I’ve never read in a book. Maybe there are other books similar to this book, but I hardly read thrillers so I wouldn’t know. But the question of whether this book is fresh or not, nothing takes away the fun I had reading this book, and for that, I appreciate it.

What I didn’t like about the book:

 I didn’t like how this book didn’t feel British. I was in the mood to read a British novel and that feeling didn’t get fulfilled. It did have subtle British notes in the book, but not what I was looking for. 

Will I read more books by this author?

Yes! I loved how even though this book was a short read, I was able to immerse myself into the book and be entertained. 

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book review

A Court of Frost And Starlight: The Book We Could Probably Live Without | Book Review

Spoiler Free

Author: Sarah J. Maas
Series: A Court of Thorn and Roses #3.1
Release Date: May 1, 2018
Page count: 239
Genres: Young Adult Fantasy, but mostly Young Adult Romance
Themes: Love, redemption, healing
My Rating: 4.5★/5

Where To Buy This Book:

Synopsis

This book takes place weeks after the war from A Court of Wings and Ruin, in the heart of where Rhys and Feyre have choosen their home: Velaris. In this novella, you follow the relationships between Feyre and Rhys, and also get a better glimpse at how Azriel, Cassian, and Lucian are healing after the war. While some healing, I’m talking about you Elain and Nesta, needs more time than others, the novella focuses on the themes of love and healing, and how in order to accept love, one has to heal. This novella explores those themes during the preparations of the festivity of the Winter Solstice, their version of Christmas.  

Synopsis by the publisher

Narrated by Feyre and Rhysand, this bridges the events in A Court of Wings and Ruin and the upcoming novels in the series. 

Feyre, Rhys, and their close-knit circle of friends are still busy rebuilding the Night Court and the vastly-changed world beyond. But Winter Solstice is finally near, and with it, a hard-earned reprieve. Yet even the festive atmosphere can’t keep the shadows of the past from looming. As Feyre navigates her first Winter Solstice as High Lady, she finds that those dearest to her have more wounds than she anticipated–scars that will have far-reaching impact on the future of their Court.

Is this a must-read to the series?

This book is like the movie Mickey’s Once Upon A Christmas. Is it important to the storyline? No. But is it cute as hell? Yes

In other words, I don’t think this book is absolutely necessary into the series. There isn’t much action that drive the trilogy further. Instead, this book offers more background information on Rhys, shows more love scenes between Feyre and Rhys, minor action events on the minor characters, and shows their adjusted lives after the war. I can see Sarah J. Maas summarizing the plot of this book in the next installment of the series, set to be published in 2021.

 Fan art:

Spoilers without context

Do I recommend this book?

I recommend this book to the die-hard fans who love the trilogy. As a die hard fan, I found this book really cute with love scenes, more details about the minor characters in their point of views, and I got to grow my appreciation to Velaris.

I don’t recommend this book to those looking for a book for full of fantasy, action, and blood. This book focuses more on the themes of love and healing. 

I recommend this book as a prelude to the next installment of the series that is yet to be published. You can wait to read this book right before the next book.

I recommend this book to those looking for a cute Christmas story, or for those looking for some light reading. The Winter Solstice is their version of a Christmas holiday where they all decorate, get gifts for one another, and spend time together.   

Things to consider before you choose to read the book:

  1. Read this book after you have read the first three books in the A Court of Thorns and Roses series. This book will spoil the events that happened in the trilogy. 
  2. Although this book does take place right after the war in A Court of Wings and Ruin, the book does summarize the series and events that take place. I haven’t read about the world since 2018, and I appreciated that this book reminded me what happened in the books, and who was who.
  3. This is a short read. It’s a little over 200 pages, but it is fast paced.
  4. This book is more of a romance novel than a fantasy novel. There was no fights, no bad guys, and no threats in this book. I only enjoyed the novel because I love the characters so much, and reading how they react with one another. For that reason, this book has received mixed criticism. Some people loved it, and some people felt “eh” about it.
  5. This book does offer multiple points of views. It’s not like Six of Crows, with every chapter being a different point of view. This book was mostly narrated by Feyre, with Rhysand in second, and a few chapters with a third person point of view of Cassian, and Mor. 
  6. There is a sex scene in this book. When it comes to heterosexual love scenes, I often skim through it. But if you like reading sex scenes, this one is very detailed.
  7. This book talks about Feyre’s menstrual cylces! I still find weird that authors don’t include these details about their cis female characters. Talking about menstrual cycles humanizes characters, and connects readers with the characters. Isn’t that authors want?
  8. Both the kindle and the print copies include a chapter from the next installment in the series. Links to purchase the books are above!

Favorite Quotes:

Stars flickered around us, sweet darkness sweeping in. As if we were the only souls in a galaxy.

To the blessed darkness from which we are born, and to which we return.

To the stars who listen, Feyre.
To the dreams that are answered, Rhys.

Follow the next page for an in-depth, spoiler book review.

Beware for spoilers!!!

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Book Recommendations book review

Six of Crows: YA’S Gold Standard of A Thriller | Book Review

Spoiler Free Book Review

Author: Leigh Bardugo

Release Date: September 29, 2015

Page count: 465

Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy

Themes: Thugs and Thives, Money Talks, Darkness

My Rating:★★★★★

Where to buy this book:

Synopsis

A soon to be Netflix series in late of 2020, Six of Crows is the young adult fantasy version of the film Ocean’s Eight. Full of action, magic, and wit, Six of Crows is an adrenaline rush ride with a group of thugs and thieves that join a heist. This group of thieves are not afraid to kill, steal, and loose their loyalty for money. Bardugo’s craft allows you to escape into a dark world with a group of thieves and you are the spectator, witnessing all of their crimes.

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Book Recommendations book review

The Old Man and the Sea | Book Review: A Perfect Escapism Novella For Quarantine

Author: Ernest Hemingway

Release Date: September 1, 1952

Page count:127

Genres: Fiction, Novella, Allegory

Themes: Defeat, Death, Pride

My Rating:★★★★★

Where to Buy This Book:

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Book Club Book Recommendations book review

The Bluest Eye | Book Review

Author: Toni Morrison

Release Date: 1970

Page count: 206

Genres: Fiction, African American Literature

Themes: Beauty, Whiteness, Seeing vs. Being Seen, Sexual abuse

My Rating:★★★★★

Where to buy this book:

I read this book as part of my book club pick for the month, and I do not regret choosing this book for the month of March. This book has everything one can hope for: wit, humor, beauty, tragedy, and imagination.

Synopsis

This book focuses on the story of Pecola during the Great Depression. Pecola is a young black girl who has an abusive father and a mother who finds comfort in her job of caring for a white home. Pecola is often mocked for her dark skin and prays for blond hair and blue eyes. In this novel, you read the story of Pecola when she was taken care by another family, learn the backstory of Pecola’s parents, and ultimately, the meaning of beauty, race, and class. 

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book review

I Read American Dirt So That You Dont Have To |Book Review

Author: Jeanine Cummins
Publish Date: January 21, 2020
Pages: 400
Genres: Hispanic American Literature, Thriller, Psychological Thriller
Themes: On the run, family bonds, trust, money as the root of all evil
My Rating:★★☆☆☆

Where to buy this book:

You may know about this book because it’s being widespread as we speak, or because of it’s heavy criticism that it’s been receiving. In this book review, I’m going to address all the goods and bads about the book.

Now, I hardly ever read new releases. I usually wait a few weeks until a book has been reviewed and then I usually pick it up. This time around, I will say that I was well aware of this book hitting the shelves when I was researching books being published in 2020 and I immediately wanted to read it. I was interested in the book of because of how it was marketed. The promo had Stephen King blurbed saying it was, “An extraordinary piece of work, a perfect balancing act with terror on one side and love on the other.” Also, Sandra Cisneros, author of The House on Mango Street said, “This book is not simply the great American novel; It’s the great novel of Las Amricas.” After reading those two comments, I was hooked. The marketing did it’s job of being interesting to read about. As a Mexican American citizen, these stories of migrants crossing to America is all my family and I talk about. But then I read this book and realized, this book relies heavily on stereotypes and does not, whatsoever reflect today’s migrant story.

Table of contents:
Page 1: Spoil free book review
Page 2: Spoiled, detailed book review
Page 3: Addressing the controversy