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Book Recommendations

🌞☀ Summer Reading 2020 ☼🏄

We might not be traveling this summer, but you can still travel by diving into a book this summer. As the majority of the world is practicing social distancing, the only mode the transportation is by reading. In your imagination that is. As the heat is making us tired, stressed, and exhausted, reading could be a tool used to relax your mind and make you smarter. Below are this summer’s must-read books.

Create a Reading Schedule

Before you pick up a book and start reading, you gotta make sure you read it. Think of a time where you can squeeze in reading into your schedule and make it a habit. For example: I do most of my reading in the evenings. At 7PM, I set everything aside, pick up my book, and read on.

Don’t Miss Out and Be Informed

I started reading this book the other day and it was captivating from the start. This book reads like a textbook, but with a prose that keeps you enthralled. This book is a look upon racist ideas since the beginning of America until the present, and how/why racism has systemically oppressed minorities. A must-read.

Antiracism is a transformative concept that reorients and reenergizes the conversation about racism—and, even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other.In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi takes readers through a widening circle of antiracist ideas—from the most basic concepts to visionary possibilities—that will help readers see all forms of racism clearly, understand their poisonous consequences, and work to oppose them in our systems and in ourselves.

Be On The Edge of Your Seat

The bride – The plus one – The best man – The wedding planner  – The bridesmaid – The body

On an island off the coast of Ireland, guests gather to celebrate two people joining their lives together as one. The groom: handsome and charming, a rising television star. The bride: smart and ambitious, a magazine publisher. It’s a wedding for a magazine, or for a celebrity: the designer dress, the remote location, the luxe party favors, the boutique whiskey. The cell phone service may be spotty and the waves may be rough, but every detail has been expertly planned and will be expertly executed.

But perfection is for plans, and people are all too human. As the champagne is popped and the festivities begin, resentments and petty jealousies begin to mingle with the reminiscences and well wishes. The groomsmen begin the drinking game from their school days. The bridesmaid not-so-accidentally ruins her dress. The bride’s oldest (male) friend gives an uncomfortably caring toast. 

And then someone turns up dead. Who didn’t wish the happy couple well? And perhaps more important, why?

Read the book before it hits the theaters! Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors.

Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

Get Out of This World

Coming soon on June 30

After receiving a frantic letter from her newly-wed cousin begging for someone to save her from a mysterious doom, Noemí Taboada heads to High Place, a distant house in the Mexican countryside. She’s not sure what she will find—her cousin’s husband, a handsome Englishman, is a stranger, and Noemí knows little about the region.   
 
Noemí is also an unlikely rescuer: She’s a glamorous debutante, and her chic gowns and perfect red lipstick are more suited for cocktail parties than amateur sleuthing. But she’s also tough and smart, with an indomitable will, and she is not afraid: Not of her cousin’s new husband, who is both menacing and alluring; not of his father, the ancient patriarch who seems to be fascinated by Noemí; and not even of the house itself, which begins to invade Noemi’s dreams with visions of blood and doom.
 
Her only ally in this inhospitable abode is the family’s youngest son. Shy and gentle, he seems to want to help Noemí, but might also be hiding dark knowledge of his family’s past. For there are many secrets behind the walls of High Place. The family’s once colossal wealth and faded mining empire kept them from prying eyes, but as Noemí digs deeper she unearths stories of violence and madness. 
 
And Noemí, mesmerized by the terrifying yet seductive world of High Place, may soon find it impossible to ever leave this enigmatic house behind.

They killed my mother.
They took our magic.
They tried to bury us.

Now we rise.

Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls.

But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope.

Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good.

Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy.

Fall In Love With Your Summer Fling

Literally the only book that has ever made me ugly-cry. Seventeen year old Veronica “Ronnie” Miller’s life was turned upside-down when her parents divorced and her father moved from New York City to Wilmington, North Carolina. Three years later, she remains angry and alienated from her parents, especially her father…until her mother decides it would be in everyone’s best interest if she spent the summer in Wilmington with him. Ronnie’s father, a former concert pianist and teacher, is living a quiet life in the beach town, immersed in creating a work of art that will become the centerpiece of a local church.

The tale that unfolds is an unforgettable story of love on many levels–first love, love between parents and children — that demonstrates, as only a Nicholas Sparks novel can, the many ways that love can break our hearts . . . and heal them.

At 12 years old, Azere promised her dying father that she’d marry a Nigerian man and preserve her culture. Years later, her mother has done everything in her power to ensure that Azere does just that. But one night at a bar, Azere meets Rafael, a handsome stranger who happens to be white. When their one night together turns into more, Azere must choose between her heart and the promise she made long ago.

Solve A Mystery

When Jan awakens in utter darkness, chained to a wall, a manacle around her wrist, her echoing screams only give her a sense of how small her cell is. As she desperately tries to reconstruct what happened and determine who is holding her prisoner, dread covers despair like a hand clamped over her mouth. Because, like the Minotaur in the labyrinth in Greek myth, her captor will be coming back for her, and all the lies will catch up to her. 

An eleven-year-old boy’s violated corpse is found in a town park. Eyewitnesses and fingerprints point unmistakably to one of Flint City’s most popular citizens. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland once coached, orders a quick and very public arrest. Maitland has an alibi, but Anderson and the district attorney soon add DNA evidence to go with the fingerprints and witnesses. Their case seems ironclad.

As the investigation expands and horrifying answers begin to emerge, King’s propulsive story kicks into high gear, generating strong tension and almost unbearable suspense. Terry Maitland seems like a nice guy, but is he wearing another face?

What are you reading this summer? Comment down below your summer reads!

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Book Recommendations

Black Lives Matter: Here are 7 Books To Remind Us About Injustices ✊🏿🤎☮️📣

All proceeds from my Amazon Affiliate account will go towards a split donation group between 70+ community bail funds, mutual aid funds, and racial justice organizers. Donate here.

Ever since the death of Gorge Floyd, our country hasn’t been the same. Racism and police brutality has always been there even before the murder of George Floyd. This idea wasn’t new, but the movement of Black Lives Matter has surged. All fifty states participated in protests to raise awareness to the black lives that have been murdered by the police.

I created this blog to be a voice for the marginal voices in society. I have always, and will forever continue to blog about black writers and their work. As an undergrad, I was lucky enough to be taught that black writers are a huge part of American Literature and how we cannot erase their past. I stand with the black lives matter movement and you should too.

Being a non-racist isn’t just enough. We must use our voices, on social media or in protests, and speak up about these injustices. Here are 7 books that everyone must read: (All purchases from my amazon affiliate account will go towards a split donation between 70+ community bail funds, mutual aid funds, and racial justice organizers)

In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list.

Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander’s unforgettable argument that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” As the Birmingham News proclaimed, it is “undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S.”

Widely heralded as a “masterful” (Washington Post) and “essential” (Slate) history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” (William Julius Wilson). Exploding the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces, Rothstein describes how the American government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. A groundbreaking, “virtually indispensable” study that has already transformed our understanding of twentieth-century urban history (Chicago Daily Observer), The Color of Law forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.

Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America.

Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.

Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.

Antiracism is a transformative concept that reorients and reenergizes the conversation about racism—and, even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. At its core, racism is a powerful system that creates false hierarchies of human value; its warped logic extends beyond race, from the way we regard people of different ethnicities or skin colors to the way we treat people of different sexes, gender identities, and body types. Racism intersects with class and culture and geography and even changes the way we see and value ourselves. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi takes readers through a widening circle of antiracist ideas—from the most basic concepts to visionary possibilities—that will help readers see all forms of racism clearly, understand their poisonous consequences, and work to oppose them in our systems and in ourselves.

Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science with his own personal story of awakening to antiracism. This is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond the awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a just and equitable society.

The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society.

Some Americans insist that we’re living in a post-racial society. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America–it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, racist ideas have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit.

In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. He uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to drive this history: Puritan minister Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. Du Bois, and legendary activist Angela Davis.

As Kendi shows, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. They were created to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation’s racial inequities.

In shedding light on this history, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose racist thinking. In the process, he gives us reason to hope.

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Book Recommendations book review

Six of Crows: YA’S Gold Standard of A Thriller | Book Review

Spoiler Free Book Review

Author: Leigh Bardugo

Release Date: September 29, 2015

Page count: 465

Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy

Themes: Thugs and Thives, Money Talks, Darkness

My Rating:★★★★★

Where to buy this book:

Synopsis

A soon to be Netflix series in late of 2020, Six of Crows is the young adult fantasy version of the film Ocean’s Eight. Full of action, magic, and wit, Six of Crows is an adrenaline rush ride with a group of thugs and thieves that join a heist. This group of thieves are not afraid to kill, steal, and loose their loyalty for money. Bardugo’s craft allows you to escape into a dark world with a group of thieves and you are the spectator, witnessing all of their crimes.

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Book Club Book Recommendations

April’s Book Club Pick: Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Page Count: 344

Genres: Suspense, Romance

Themes: Love, Infatuation, Good vs. Evil, Violence and Revenge.

Access The Book For Free or Buy it

Book Club Agenda

Every week for the month of April, I will publish book club content to enhance your reading of Wuthering Heights.
Week One: Meet the Characters
Week Two: How Wuthering Heights Influenced Pop Culture
Week Three: Let’s talk about the major themes. How Heathcliff and Carol Baskin Are Murderers
Week Four: Wuthering Heights Book Review

How to Join the Book Club

Just by you reading our book club pick, you’re already in the book club! You can read at your own pace, and all posts will have spoiler warnings. You are also encouraged to join the Facebook group in which all book club members will be welcome to join the conversation, take part on quizzes and polls, and help us pick our book club pick for May!

Synopsis

Perhaps the most haunting and tormented love story ever written, Wuthering Heights is the tale of the troubled orphan Heathcliff and his doomed love for Catherine Earnshaw. The windswept moors are the unforgettable setting of this tale of the love between the foundling Heathcliff and his wealthy benefactor’s daughter, Catherine. Through Catherine’s betrayal of Heathcliff and his bitter vengeance, their mythic passion haunts the next generation even after their deaths. Incorporating elements of many genres—from gothic novels and ghost stories to poetic allegory—and transcending them all, Wuthering Heights is a mystifying and powerful tour de force.

Quotes

If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.

He’s more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same.

I have not broken your heart – you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine. 

Fan Art

Join us tomorrow for Meet the Characters of Wuthering Heights.

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Book Recommendations Reading Tips & Tricks

The Ultimate Readers Guide to Quarantine

Everyone around the world is forced to be at home and practice social distancing. Now that we are forced to to stay home, we should take advantage of this time to read, create, and relax. Below I have my list of ideas to kill the boredom, read more books, create book marks and book covers, and most importantly, multiple ways to challenge your mind.

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Book Recommendations book review

The Old Man and the Sea | Book Review: A Perfect Escapism Novella For Quarantine

Author: Ernest Hemingway

Release Date: September 1, 1952

Page count:127

Genres: Fiction, Novella, Allegory

Themes: Defeat, Death, Pride

My Rating:★★★★★

Where to Buy This Book:

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Book Club Book Recommendations book review

The Bluest Eye | Book Review

Author: Toni Morrison

Release Date: 1970

Page count: 206

Genres: Fiction, African American Literature

Themes: Beauty, Whiteness, Seeing vs. Being Seen, Sexual abuse

My Rating:★★★★★

Where to buy this book:

I read this book as part of my book club pick for the month, and I do not regret choosing this book for the month of March. This book has everything one can hope for: wit, humor, beauty, tragedy, and imagination.

Synopsis

This book focuses on the story of Pecola during the Great Depression. Pecola is a young black girl who has an abusive father and a mother who finds comfort in her job of caring for a white home. Pecola is often mocked for her dark skin and prays for blond hair and blue eyes. In this novel, you read the story of Pecola when she was taken care by another family, learn the backstory of Pecola’s parents, and ultimately, the meaning of beauty, race, and class. 

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Book Recommendations

10 Short Reads You Can Read this Leap Day!

It’s Leap day! For those who don’t know, every four years we gain an extra day in the year and that falls on February 29th.

So the dilemma is that you have an extra day! There are so many good thing about Today’s leap day. First and foremost, is that it falls on a Saturday. A day that most have when they work Monday-Friday. And secondly, is that the weather should be nice. At least in Southern California, it’s going to a day in the 60’s. A good day to lay in bed, on the couch, take a breathe, and relax My recommendation is to use that day to better yourself.Go to the gym, get a work out done, go the beach or head to the outdoors, and pick out a book!

I mean Bill Gates takes two whole weeks to himself to do nothing but read. I’m only suggesting that you read a whole day, which isn’t much compared to one of the richest man alive.

Here are recommendations on what to read this Leap day in one sitting along with a link to the ebook, because your time is precious and you need that book now!

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Book Recommendations book review

☠ Crown of Midnight ☠ Book Review

Author: Sarah J. Maas
Originally Published: August 15, 2013
Series: Throne of Glass #2
Genre: Young Adult Fantasy, Young Adult Romance, Young Adult Adventure
My Rating: ★★★★★
Average Rating: 4.45★’s
Length: 420 Pages
Themes: Young love, friendship, good vs. evil, dealing with loss.

Where to find this book:

Synopsis:

Assassin Celaena Saradothein is told by the King for which she serves to, that she must kill a man. But what the king doesn’t know is that even though she’s a hired assassin, she does things her way. In this sequel we follow one mission that ends up threatening her and the lives around her.

In short: Imagine Game of Thrones, but the young adult version.

Synopsis from the publisher:

She is the greatest assassin her world has ever known.
But does she have the heart of a killer?

After a year of hard labor in the Salt Mines of Endovier, eighteen-year-old assassin Celaena Sardothien has won the king’s contest to become the new royal assassin. But Calaena is far from loyal to the crown. Keeping up the charade – while pretending to do the king’s bidding – will test her skills in an entirely new way. And it certainly isn’t the only point of confusion for the young girl. Because though she’s made her choice between Dorian and Chaol, the ways of the heart are never simple…

Fan Art:

Spoilers Without Context:

Do I recommend this book?

Hell yes! This book had everything that I wanted: love scenes, adventure, magic.

Although the first book was not Sarah J. Maas best, this book made up for that. I can see why the first book was set up in that way and that was to set up the plot for the second book.

Before you read this book know:

  1. This is the second book to the series so before you read this, make sure you read the first one, Throne of Glass.
  2. This book is better than her first book in the series, and that’s a fact.
  3. Expect loss. People will die.
  4. There are love scenes. Not fifty shades of grey explicit, but enough for the imagination.

Favorite Quotes:

“The best lies were always mixed with truth.” 

“What does that mean?” he demanded. 

She smiled sadly. “You’ll figure it out. And when you do…” She shook her head, knowing she shouldn’t say it, but doing it anyway. “When you do, I want you to remember that it wouldn’t have made any difference to me. It’s never made any difference to me when it came to you. I’d still pick you. I’ll always pick you.”

“To escape death, she’d become death.” 

I’m keeping this non-spoiler review as dry as possible because I don’t want anything to be spoiled, it’s that good.

Read down below for a more detailed review, with spoilers. If you don’t mind spoilers or have already read this book: read below in the next page.

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Book Recommendations

Best Books of the Decade

This decade I’ve read a total of 203 books and this is just a compilation of the best books I’ve read that were published in the years from 2010-2019. This is not going to be some bullsh*t list of books published in the decade, highlighting books that were not even read by person who created the list.

This decade was the time when I started to read books outside of the Twilight series. I read all of the Twilight books, except Breaking Dawn, in 2009, and after that I thought, now what? I loved and enjoyed reading and I did my own research on books I’d like to read, and the rest is history.

Here are 10 books that we’re my favorite books I’ve read this decade, in no particular order.

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

I remember reading this book in two days, often taking breaks so that I wouldn’t finish it, because I didn’t want this book to end. This book was also the first book that made me cry. I also probably let five people read this book.

This book is told from the point of view of Hazel, a teenager who has terminal cancer and falls in love with a boy named Augustus Waters. It’s hilarious, inspiring, and romantic. What I loved so much about book is how incredibly cheesy this book was, but John Green has the ability to bring humor and wit as a way to mock the idea of love. Hazel and Augustus constantly tell each other, “Okay?” “Okay.” Within this book, okay has become a metaphor for the couple to mock the idea of forever. They say it to each other to remind each other that they love one another, and also as a way to flirt with each other. A book I will never forget.

“You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world…but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices.” 

John Green

Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

The first book that actually made me laugh out loud. And also the first book I read outside of young adult fiction. I remember reading this book and having the chance to give 20 copies away as part of World Book Night.

This book is put together through letters, blog posts, emails, and text messages. It tells the story of Bernadette who goes missing and it’s the daughter’s mission to find where she goes. This book is hilarious for portraying the insanity of white privileged women who having nothing to do, and that nothingness is what leads to the events in the book. This book has themes of self-acceptness, happiness, and hope.

“Life is a stew, and pot is poop.If someone stirred even a teeny-bit of poop in the stew, would you really want to eat it?

Maria Semple

Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling

This is another book that has made my laugh out loud. I love Mindy Kaling for her wit and humor.

In this book she discusses how she made lemons out lemonade without dealing with a huge loss in her lifetime. She discusses how she became a Hollywood star despite the fact that she was a minority. She talks about her love for cake, her love for The Office star, B.J. Novak, and, “Mindy turns the anxieties, the glamour, and the celebrations of her second coming-of-age into a laugh-out-loud funny collection of essays that anyone who’s ever been at a turning point in their life or career can relate to.”

“Work hard, know your shit, show your shit, and then feel entitled. Listen to no one except the two smartest and kindest adults you know, and that doesn’t always mean your parents. If you do that, you will be fine.

Mindy Kaling

All The Light We Cannot See by Antony Doerr

I loved this book. This book was a reminder of why historical fiction is important. It was so interesting and the way in which Doerr tell’s the story, makes my mind travel 600 miles per minute.

This book is a historical fiction that tells two separate stories of a blind girl in Paris and a man in Germany who are trying to survive the devastation during World War II. This book has themes of light, loss, and haunting.

“Open your eyes and see what you can with them before they close forever.” 

Anthony Doerr

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

This is probably one of the few books that will have a lasting memory inside my brain. I will never forget how twisted the plot is and how I reacted to it. I remember reading the plot twist and taking a five minute break to reflect. I had to go as far to going back to the pages that I read to connect the puzzle pieces, something I never do when I’m reading my book.

This book is about a married couple that explores the dynamics of how they met, why they love each other, and the risks they had to take for one another. Then suddenly, the wife goes missing, the news outlet start covering the story, blame the husband for murder, and ruin both of their reputations. This book is a must read.

Men always say that as the defining compliment, don’t they? She’s a cool girl. Being the Cool Girl means I am a hot, brilliant, funny woman who adores football, poker, dirty jokes, and burping, who plays video games, drinks cheap beer, loves threesomes and anal sex, and jams hot dogs and hamburgers into her mouth like she’s hosting the world’s biggest culinary gang bang while somehow maintaining a size 2, because Cool Girls are above all hot. Hot and understanding. Cool Girls never get angry; they only smile in a chagrined, loving manner and let their men do whatever they want. Go ahead, shit on me, I don’t mind, I’m the Cool Girl

Gillian Flynn

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler

I read this book in one of my english literature classes and I was surprised I loved this book. I’m only surprised because professors choose random and, in my opinion, boring modern literature novels. But! This book was so interesting and has one of the biggest plot twists that I did not see coming.

For the summary for this one, I’m going to cheat because I feel like I’d ruin the plot so here is the summary from the publisher: “Meet the Cooke family. Our narrator is Rosemary Cooke. As a child, she never stopped talking; now that she’s started college, she has wrapped herself in silence: the silence of intentional forgetting, of protective cover. Rosemary is now an only child, but she used to have a sister the same age as her, and an older brother. Both are now gone—vanished from her life. Her once lively mother is a shell of her former self, her clever and imperious father now a distant, brooding man. And there was something unique about Rosemary’s sister, Fern.
You’ll have to find out for yourself what it is that makes her unhappy family unlike any other.”

In everyone’s life there are people who stay and people who go and people who are taken against their will.

by Karen Joy Fowler

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

This book is probably the best YA Fantasy novel that I’ve read this decade. Period. I always struggle pushing through reading the first 100-200 pages of a Sarah J. Maas book, but with this book, I loved every single page, chapter, and dialogue. I cried, laughed, was on the edge of my seat, threw this book across the room, picked it up and repeated it all over again. I love this book so much, it’s bringing me tears as I’m writing this.

This book is a continuation to the first installment of the series, A Court of Thorns and Roses. This series is filled with Farries, action, magic, and love. I totally recommend this trilogy.

To the stars who listen—and the dreams that are answered.

Sarah J. Maas

Simon Vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

A book that will forever stay inside my heart. (For those wondering, of course the book was better than the movie). This book was full of thoughts and relatable in terms of what it was like for me in high school. I read this as a college student and I read this book, I was brought back into high school, but weirdly enough, the memories that were brought up in my mind, were the good ones.

This book is what inspired the movie, Love Simon. This book is about a 16 year old boy named Simon closeted in high school and has an online relationship with another boy in his school. But then another boy finds those emails, black mails and everything else goes crazy. “Now, change-averse Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he’s pushed out—without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy he’s never met.”

He talked about the ocean between people. And how the whole point of everything is to find a shore worth swimming to.

Beck Albertalli

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

A book that will also forever be stuck inside my head. This book was so interesting and different than anything I’ve read before.

This book is about a Clare in 1945, and is taken back in time out of nowhere into 1753 in the middle of a war where she is declared an outlander and finds herself in the arms of Jamie. This book is a romance book more than anything, but it also has a lot of history, mystery and action filled into this book. I can’t wait to continue reading this series in 2020.

When I asked my da how ye knew which was the right woman, he told me when the time came, I’d have no doubt. And I didn’t. When I woke in the dark under that tree on the road to Leoch, with you sitting on my chest, cursing me for bleeding to death, I said to myself, ‘Jamie Fraser, for all ye canna see what she looks like, and for all she weighs as much as a good draft horse, this is the woman

Diana Gabaldon

Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare

I loved this book so much. First of all, I’m a huge fan of her Shadowhunter series and the fact that those characters were going to be in this book along with new characters, based in Los Angeles, I was excited!!! It was so much fun to read this book and having a clear picture of where the book was taking place.

This young adult fantasy book is the first in it’s trilogy where it follows Emma in Los Angeles as a shadowhunter where she is on a mission to discover what killed her parents. This book is filled with demons, magicians, fairies, and romance. A must read for those who want to read YA Fantasy.

“There was beauty in the idea of freedom, but it was an illusion. Every human heart was chained by love.” 

Cassandra Clare.

What were your favorite books of the decade? Comment down below and share!