Categories
Pop Culture

Why Every “Books To Read for Quarantine/Lockdown” List is Trash

Out of all of the digital content that was released during our government mandated lockdowns, all of the articles, videos, and tweets being released of what books to read during quarantine bothered me so much. LIKE WHAT WHY?

I underststand that because most of us have time on our hands because of unemployment, working less, or just working from home, and we need ideas of what to do with our time. I just don’t appreciate the message behind it.

Most of my agenda is trying to push forward the message of why we must read in a fast paced world. While others are telling you to read only when you have down time. Which is a good message don’t get me wrong, it’s just that many people would read that and say, “Oh well im busy and I don’t have time to read.” Although reading is great for when ever you have time for yourself, but reading requires effort for you to make time for it out of your busy schedule. 

During the first few weeks I was even motivated to creating a list of books to read during quarantine, but my whole blog is an escape to reality! It would be pointless for me to compile a list of books to read in quarantine when literally any book or genre is good to read during quarantine. 

Here are my reasons why every “Books to Read in Quarantine” list is trash:

1. Every book allows us to escape
A lot of the books of that are mentioned in these lists are books that are made for you to escape the harsh reality of COVID-19. Which is a dumb idea because literally EVERY FICTION BOOK IN THE WORLD is an escape to reality. Books are made for us to escape into the world of every book. Any book published before March of 2020 is a book to escape reality. 

2. The recommendations
Most of the book recommendations on these lists are so broad. Everyone has different tastes and there’s no way that a list has a book for every person in the world to read. There’s a reason to why these books are being recommended, which brings me to my next point.

3. They Announce New Releases
Most of these lists recommend new releases, books that are affecting sales due to COVID-19, so they are trying to advertise these books for you to read. Don’t get me wrong, there are some great new releases, but there are also great books that were published a year ago, or a decade a go, or even a century. Publishers are trying to hit their projected sales quota. 

4. They recommend books that are on the NYT Bestseller lists.
Most of these books that are recommended are on the bestsellers list and that’s because they wanna recommend books that you’ve heard of or are popular. Which is a good idea on paper, but there are hundreds of books that were once a hit, and still are a hit. There are also some very good books written by indie writers who don’t have a huge publishing house behind them to promote their books. Not only that, most good books don’t make the New York Times bestseller list because it’s a list of 20 books out of the thousands of books released within the past two years. 

5. Book Bias 
I’m sure that the recommended books that Ted loved are good, but will I like them? Ted, you don’t know me. You don’t know my tastes, and what kind of
books that I like. Many of these picks are picks by one person. 

6. More pictures, no words.
Lots of these lists do very little in talking about why this is a good book, and they give you a short synopsis, and show you a huge picture of the book. Rather than telling you what books to read, it tells you which pretty cover to read. 

Do these lists work? Have you been tempted to read a book from a recommended publisher? Let me know down in the comments!

Categories
Book Tag

📚😬Mid Year Book Freak Out Tag 😬📚

It’s the middle of the year and woah, what a year! This year, my reading has been very versatile and distinct that I often have to check back onto my Goodreads and remind myself, oh yeah I read this! I would of loved to have read more books, but if anything this post has motivated me to read more books and reach my goal of reading 50 books this year. So here is a summary of my reads thus-far.

Best Book Of The Year- So Far

You can access my book review here, but I really loved this book. This book had it all. Romance, humor, and kept me on the edge of my seat.

Best Sequel Read So Far in 2020

You can access my book review here. I read this in the beginning of the year and it was so good. After reading the ACOTAR trilogy, I read Throne of Glass and didn’t love it and so I was unmotivated to read the next book in the series. But, I heard it only gets better and boy, I loved it. This book really enriched the world, and developed Celaena into this force of nature that cannot be messed with. I can’t wait until I read the next book in this series.

Newest Release I Haven’t Read Yet, But I Want To

I bought this book on release day, and I haven’t had the chance to read it yet. Mostly because it’s 800+ pages and big books give me anxiety, especially first in series since they often world develop and info dump the reader into the world. But I have to read this book. I have to. It’s Sarah J. Maas. The queen of fantasy.

Most Anticipated Release for the Second Half of the Year

Even though Stephenie Meyer has sparked some controversy, I’m still curious for this depiction of Edward. As a former die-hard twilight fan, I’m excited to dive into the series that made me a bookworm.

Biggest Disappointment

My most read book review up-to date, this book was bad. This book relies on so many Mexican sterotypes and downfalls that it really doesn’t capture thee migrant story. This book had the potential to inform readers unto our humanitarian crisis of Latinx members fleeing their country for a better life. Instead, it tells the successful story of a middle-class Mexican with a huge bank account, crossing the border illegally through to Arizona. I don’t recommend.

Biggest Surprise

I bought this book at my local thrift shop and decided to give it a shot and boy, I was surprised this book still holds up. I have never read any Narnia book, so this book really surprised me in it’s rich detail unto the world of Narnia. I was expecting a simple, watered down fantasy novel about talking animals, but boy, this had elements of horror, suspense, and sci-fi. Something I didn’t expect in a children’s fantasy novel. 10/10 recommend.

Favorite New Author

You may access my book review here. I’ve read Toni Morrison’s essays and excerpts, but never a complete novel and this was simply great. It made me laugh, cry, and interested into the world of Pecola. A young girl who prays for the bluest eye, in hopes that she is accepted into society as a beautiful black girl.

Newest Fictional Crush

Kaz from Six of Crows. Kaz is such an interesting character. He is dark, mysterious, a huge thief, but he has a dark past, protects those who he loves, and is determined. He also has a sense of humor that is like no other YA character I have ever read.

Newest Favorite Character

Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights. Heathcliff is like that epic villain you cannot stop looking at. Even though he is violent, rude, and abusive, he is a trainwreck you cannot stop looking at. I often caught myself feeling bad for him at how mistreated he was in the book. He’s an orphan, hated by his foster family, laughed at for being a gypsy, and abandoned by his soulmate because he didn’t have the social ranking Cathy was looking for. Not only his own kids love him! Truly a character that is often forgotten about.

Book That Made Me Cry

Without giving much away, the ending made me cry. It’s even making me cry thinking about it. But this is one of those books where you cry at what could of happened but didn’t happen. Also this book was a really good depiction at anxiety and how anxiety overtakes your decision making.

Most Beautiful Book I’ve Bought This Year

I haven’t read this book yet, but this book has one the most prettiest and captivating book covers I’ve seen this year. This is a book that I bought by judging it’s cover.

Books To be Read By The End of The Year

Like every year, I have lots of books in my TBR pile. But here a few that must be read, without an exception.

As a huge fan of Cassandra Clare, I must read this book. I loved Lady Midnight so much that I cannot procrastinate this trilogy any longer.

As a fan of Pride & Prejudice, I can no longer procrastinate her books and this book is without exception. I’ve heard so many good things about this book that there is no excuse as to why I should not read this.

I need to read this and find out what’s the hype. This book has been widely read this years, and it’s all everyone talks about. I only want to read this book to see what’s the hype and why it’s everywhere.

This book has been on my TBR pile for YEARS. I loved the movies, and I’ve always wanted to read this. I’m probably very late to the party, but I’m excited to read this book this year. (I’m in house Ravenclaw btw)

Hows your mid-year reading going? Let me know in the comment section down below!

Categories
Book Recommendations

Black Lives Matter: Here are 7 Books To Remind Us About Injustices ✊🏿🤎☮️📣

All proceeds from my Amazon Affiliate account will go towards a split donation group between 70+ community bail funds, mutual aid funds, and racial justice organizers. Donate here.

Ever since the death of Gorge Floyd, our country hasn’t been the same. Racism and police brutality has always been there even before the murder of George Floyd. This idea wasn’t new, but the movement of Black Lives Matter has surged. All fifty states participated in protests to raise awareness to the black lives that have been murdered by the police.

I created this blog to be a voice for the marginal voices in society. I have always, and will forever continue to blog about black writers and their work. As an undergrad, I was lucky enough to be taught that black writers are a huge part of American Literature and how we cannot erase their past. I stand with the black lives matter movement and you should too.

Being a non-racist isn’t just enough. We must use our voices, on social media or in protests, and speak up about these injustices. Here are 7 books that everyone must read: (All purchases from my amazon affiliate account will go towards a split donation between 70+ community bail funds, mutual aid funds, and racial justice organizers)

In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list.

Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander’s unforgettable argument that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” As the Birmingham News proclaimed, it is “undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S.”

Widely heralded as a “masterful” (Washington Post) and “essential” (Slate) history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” (William Julius Wilson). Exploding the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces, Rothstein describes how the American government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. A groundbreaking, “virtually indispensable” study that has already transformed our understanding of twentieth-century urban history (Chicago Daily Observer), The Color of Law forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.

Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America.

Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.

Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.

Antiracism is a transformative concept that reorients and reenergizes the conversation about racism—and, even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. At its core, racism is a powerful system that creates false hierarchies of human value; its warped logic extends beyond race, from the way we regard people of different ethnicities or skin colors to the way we treat people of different sexes, gender identities, and body types. Racism intersects with class and culture and geography and even changes the way we see and value ourselves. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi takes readers through a widening circle of antiracist ideas—from the most basic concepts to visionary possibilities—that will help readers see all forms of racism clearly, understand their poisonous consequences, and work to oppose them in our systems and in ourselves.

Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science with his own personal story of awakening to antiracism. This is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond the awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a just and equitable society.

The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society.

Some Americans insist that we’re living in a post-racial society. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America–it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, racist ideas have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit.

In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. He uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to drive this history: Puritan minister Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. Du Bois, and legendary activist Angela Davis.

As Kendi shows, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. They were created to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation’s racial inequities.

In shedding light on this history, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose racist thinking. In the process, he gives us reason to hope.

Categories
Reading Tips & Tricks

Bullet Journal Spreads and Ideas for Book Readers and Bloggers

What is a bullet journal?

A literal definition of a bullet journal is a journal that uses dots rather than lines. The dots are used as a guide to create charts, and shapes.

A figurative definition of a bullet journal is a journal that you customize to your own liking. Bullet journals are for the planners that hate traditional planners because truth is, everyone has different priorities, things to do, and different day-to-day routines. Bullet journals are for fast-logging, organizing your ideas, to-do lists, and planning. So yes, a bullet journal is a diary, a planner, and a to-do list all in one.

This is an example of a bullet journal spread. This journalist wrote their wreaking spread along with their to-do list, goals list, and weather ideas. This is just an idea what you could do with your bullet journal.

Although the idea of bullet journaling sounds appealing, it isn’t for everyone. Bullet journals are time consuming since you have to create your own spreads, use different colors to your likening, and write all of your goals, motivations, and to-do’s all in one list. Not only is bullet journaling time consuming, they are also an investment. Bullet journals range anywhere from $5-50, and besides that, you have to invest on good pens, pencils, rulers, and markers. But at the end of the day, the work is rewarding. Everything is organized in a few pages, and you feel one step ahead. Plus, the whole process of journaling is relaxing for those who love arts and crafts. You have the option to use colors, stickers, and Washi tape.

Since bullet journals force you to create your own spreads, readers use books as inspirations to plan their day, write their ideas, and plan their next reads. Here are some of my essentials spreads, monthly themes, daily themes, and reading trackers, all book themed!

TBR (to be read) Spreads

TBR spreads are essential for every reader. They allow you to jot down all the books that need to read for when you are looking for your next read.

Created by dear friend, Jessica. Thanks Jessica!

I like this spread because it portrays the bookshelf that you may or may not have. This a great example for those who love to see their book visually rather than a list. The use of highlighter colors bring out the books, and appeal to they eye. This spread allows you to have up to 50 books, in one page, and drawn literally.

This spread is also simplistic and easy to draw. All you have to draw are rectangles and squares, use highlighters to draw around the boarders of the books, and use a pen to write in small print the books that need to be read.

View this post on Instagram

Playing around with next month’s reading list spread 📖

A post shared by Kara C. (@kacolettering) on

This is a custom made spread by Cara, thank you Cara!!!

This spread is a good way to introduce the month as it has your TBR books for the month, along with a calendar and a separate box for favorite books.

I love this spread because it has a TBR list, a calendar, and colors to make it stand out.

From Pinterest

This a good monthly book spreads for bloggers. This spread allows you to list the books you want to read for the month, and opposed to rating it for stars, you could highlight the emoji that summarizes your relation to the book. Or if you want, you substitute the smiley faces to stars.

This spread is also a good idea for readers who want to get back into reading, and it allows you have a to be read list, a read list, and a rating system all in one page.

My favorite part about this spread is the detail on the pages. You could see the zig-zag and the pencil used to show the age of a book.

From Pinterest

This is a simplistic TBR spread for hardcore readers who have huge libraries, and huge lists of books to read. This is something that I could take advantage of since I’m always reading different books and short stories for the blog.

Taken from Pinterest

This is a great, and a beautiful spread for those who want to draw a reading nook. This is a page for those who are artsy and love to take their time on spreads.

As an English major and a writer, my drawling skills are limited, but this is just a pretty picture to look at.

Monthly Theme Spreads

Most bullet journals, depending on those who like them or not, have a page or two dedicated to presenting the months by a quote or an image. For example, someone’s December intro page would be a picture of a Christmas tree or a snow man.

From Pinterest

This page looks like a lot of work, but then again, bullet journaling are meant to relax you by using colors and drawing objects. This idea is great because it shows the many different types of books, and the classic looks of books from the 19th century.

Now I love this image. Although this may be really hard, it gives the idea of using Belle as a literary theme for your bullet journal. Belle has been a beloved literary character by Disney, and represents the model of reader who reads simply to escape into another world better than their own.

https://pin.it/5UGHt61

This spread is another great theme of comic books! Comic books and bullet journals share the idea that they are straight forward, and fastly paced.

This a great idea for those who love comics and have the freedom to use bold colors, markers, and icons.

List of Books Read Spreads

Below are my compilation of bullet journal read books spreads, used as a reference page for readers, book critics, and bloggers to keep track of the books that they loved or hated.

Taken from Pinterest

This is a great spread for hardcore readers and bloggers. This easily organizes the books you read, the dates read, and your ratings. The use of glitter on the top is just an example of how you can make your pages stand out. Plus, they make me feel good so I love glitter on my bullet journals.

Taken from Pinterest

This is a great example of keeping track of the books you read. I love the way that this page looks, but it also stresses me out because it looks so complicated to create. This is definitely a spread for those who are talented at creating 3D art.

Another great artsy, challenging spread idea. I love this spread because it scatters the books all over the floor, almost making it look like 3D art. It also uses details of the spider webs, to evoke the passage of time.

This spread is not also a spread to bring out your nostalgia, but it can also be used as a list to note the books that you have already read.

This another example of simplistic read list. What I appreciate about this spread is that it allows space for a key/legend to remind you of your rating system, and uses lines to organize the columns for each book.

Quote Spreads

Bullet journals often have pages that dedicate an entire page with uplifting quotes from celebrities, philosophers, and authors. Here are some of my favorite artistic quote spreads for artsy fans.

This was a custom made bullet journal by @beansbujo. Please follow her on Instagram!! Her
account is so pretty, filled with bullet journal ideas for days.

I love this spread because it gives you the idea of using a favorite quote from your favorite book, and create something unique. Using the cover for inspiration, you can use the colors, and symbols as part Of the design.

https://pin.it/5UGHt61
Taken by Pinterest

I love this design as a designated bullet journal spread for a TBR list and a quotes page.

https://pin.it/633reFW
https://pin.it/4TpGITD

Reading Trackers

Reading trackers are for those who want to keep track of days that they’ve read. They are perfect for those who are trying to create a routine out of reading.


https://pin.it/9TSW9U6

Besides the drawing of a girl carrying the book, this reading tracker is great because it’s a whole year view of your reading habits. This tracker allows you to track all 365 days, and the pages that you read using a color key to show how much reading you have done.

This is great idea for readers to keep track of the series that they are reading. As someone who starts multiple book series, and almost never finishes them, I need this bullet journal spread to keep track of my reads.

Now I love this bullet journal spread because of Winnie the Pooh. I love that character.

Okay now for serious talk, this bullet journal spread is perfect for keeping track the minutes and hours that you read, alongside with a rating system for your books.

This is a custom spread and quote by Freya. Please follow her Instagram account!!! Her page is filled with bullet journal ideas for weeklies, dailies, and trackers.

This is an a weekly spread, using an opened book as the inspiration. This image is so pretty for the use of colors. Not only could this be used as a weekly spread, this could be used as a reading tracker for the books or short stories read. This spread could also be used as a tracker for books to be read, or book releases, or books to review.

This bullet journal spread is great for a more detailed list of the books read. You could keep track of the books that you read along with a list of your impressions of the book.

Now I love this spread. It has a great use of colors and organization, with each color meaning the books you read, along with a sleek and clean rating system. The chart on the second chart is also a good idea for those who want to keep track of the pages read for the month.

In Conclusion

In conclusion, these are just ideas. You could use these spreads as inspirations and you could tweak it to your liking. Not only that, these page spreads are versatile. You could use it on your journals, notebooks, the back of books, a whiteboard, where ever you want!

If you have some spreads of your own, email me at readinglitty@gmail.com and submit your submissions to be featured on this blog post.

Do you bullet journal? Comment below your response! 🙂

Categories
book review

A Court of Frost And Starlight: The Book We Could Probably Live Without | Book Review

Spoiler Free

Author: Sarah J. Maas
Series: A Court of Thorn and Roses #3.1
Release Date: May 1, 2018
Page count: 239
Genres: Young Adult Fantasy, but mostly Young Adult Romance
Themes: Love, redemption, healing
My Rating: 4.5★/5

Where To Buy This Book:

Synopsis

This book takes place weeks after the war from A Court of Wings and Ruin, in the heart of where Rhys and Feyre have choosen their home: Velaris. In this novella, you follow the relationships between Feyre and Rhys, and also get a better glimpse at how Azriel, Cassian, and Lucian are healing after the war. While some healing, I’m talking about you Elain and Nesta, needs more time than others, the novella focuses on the themes of love and healing, and how in order to accept love, one has to heal. This novella explores those themes during the preparations of the festivity of the Winter Solstice, their version of Christmas.  

Synopsis by the publisher

Narrated by Feyre and Rhysand, this bridges the events in A Court of Wings and Ruin and the upcoming novels in the series. 

Feyre, Rhys, and their close-knit circle of friends are still busy rebuilding the Night Court and the vastly-changed world beyond. But Winter Solstice is finally near, and with it, a hard-earned reprieve. Yet even the festive atmosphere can’t keep the shadows of the past from looming. As Feyre navigates her first Winter Solstice as High Lady, she finds that those dearest to her have more wounds than she anticipated–scars that will have far-reaching impact on the future of their Court.

Is this a must-read to the series?

This book is like the movie Mickey’s Once Upon A Christmas. Is it important to the storyline? No. But is it cute as hell? Yes

In other words, I don’t think this book is absolutely necessary into the series. There isn’t much action that drive the trilogy further. Instead, this book offers more background information on Rhys, shows more love scenes between Feyre and Rhys, minor action events on the minor characters, and shows their adjusted lives after the war. I can see Sarah J. Maas summarizing the plot of this book in the next installment of the series, set to be published in 2021.

 Fan art:

Spoilers without context

Do I recommend this book?

I recommend this book to the die-hard fans who love the trilogy. As a die hard fan, I found this book really cute with love scenes, more details about the minor characters in their point of views, and I got to grow my appreciation to Velaris.

I don’t recommend this book to those looking for a book for full of fantasy, action, and blood. This book focuses more on the themes of love and healing. 

I recommend this book as a prelude to the next installment of the series that is yet to be published. You can wait to read this book right before the next book.

I recommend this book to those looking for a cute Christmas story, or for those looking for some light reading. The Winter Solstice is their version of a Christmas holiday where they all decorate, get gifts for one another, and spend time together.   

Things to consider before you choose to read the book:

  1. Read this book after you have read the first three books in the A Court of Thorns and Roses series. This book will spoil the events that happened in the trilogy. 
  2. Although this book does take place right after the war in A Court of Wings and Ruin, the book does summarize the series and events that take place. I haven’t read about the world since 2018, and I appreciated that this book reminded me what happened in the books, and who was who.
  3. This is a short read. It’s a little over 200 pages, but it is fast paced.
  4. This book is more of a romance novel than a fantasy novel. There was no fights, no bad guys, and no threats in this book. I only enjoyed the novel because I love the characters so much, and reading how they react with one another. For that reason, this book has received mixed criticism. Some people loved it, and some people felt “eh” about it.
  5. This book does offer multiple points of views. It’s not like Six of Crows, with every chapter being a different point of view. This book was mostly narrated by Feyre, with Rhysand in second, and a few chapters with a third person point of view of Cassian, and Mor. 
  6. There is a sex scene in this book. When it comes to heterosexual love scenes, I often skim through it. But if you like reading sex scenes, this one is very detailed.
  7. This book talks about Feyre’s menstrual cylces! I still find weird that authors don’t include these details about their cis female characters. Talking about menstrual cycles humanizes characters, and connects readers with the characters. Isn’t that authors want?
  8. Both the kindle and the print copies include a chapter from the next installment in the series. Links to purchase the books are above!

Favorite Quotes:

Stars flickered around us, sweet darkness sweeping in. As if we were the only souls in a galaxy.

To the blessed darkness from which we are born, and to which we return.

To the stars who listen, Feyre.
To the dreams that are answered, Rhys.

Follow the next page for an in-depth, spoiler book review.

Beware for spoilers!!!

Categories
Book Club Book Recommendations

April’s Book Club Pick: Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Page Count: 344

Genres: Suspense, Romance

Themes: Love, Infatuation, Good vs. Evil, Violence and Revenge.

Access The Book For Free or Buy it

Book Club Agenda

Every week for the month of April, I will publish book club content to enhance your reading of Wuthering Heights.
Week One: Meet the Characters
Week Two: How Wuthering Heights Influenced Pop Culture
Week Three: Let’s talk about the major themes. How Heathcliff and Carol Baskin Are Murderers
Week Four: Wuthering Heights Book Review

How to Join the Book Club

Just by you reading our book club pick, you’re already in the book club! You can read at your own pace, and all posts will have spoiler warnings. You are also encouraged to join the Facebook group in which all book club members will be welcome to join the conversation, take part on quizzes and polls, and help us pick our book club pick for May!

Synopsis

Perhaps the most haunting and tormented love story ever written, Wuthering Heights is the tale of the troubled orphan Heathcliff and his doomed love for Catherine Earnshaw. The windswept moors are the unforgettable setting of this tale of the love between the foundling Heathcliff and his wealthy benefactor’s daughter, Catherine. Through Catherine’s betrayal of Heathcliff and his bitter vengeance, their mythic passion haunts the next generation even after their deaths. Incorporating elements of many genres—from gothic novels and ghost stories to poetic allegory—and transcending them all, Wuthering Heights is a mystifying and powerful tour de force.

Quotes

If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.

He’s more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same.

I have not broken your heart – you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine. 

Fan Art

Join us tomorrow for Meet the Characters of Wuthering Heights.

Categories
Book Recommendations Reading Tips & Tricks

The Ultimate Readers Guide to Quarantine

Everyone around the world is forced to be at home and practice social distancing. Now that we are forced to to stay home, we should take advantage of this time to read, create, and relax. Below I have my list of ideas to kill the boredom, read more books, create book marks and book covers, and most importantly, multiple ways to challenge your mind.

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Book Recommendations

10 Short Reads You Can Read this Leap Day!

It’s Leap day! For those who don’t know, every four years we gain an extra day in the year and that falls on February 29th.

So the dilemma is that you have an extra day! There are so many good thing about Today’s leap day. First and foremost, is that it falls on a Saturday. A day that most have when they work Monday-Friday. And secondly, is that the weather should be nice. At least in Southern California, it’s going to a day in the 60’s. A good day to lay in bed, on the couch, take a breathe, and relax My recommendation is to use that day to better yourself.Go to the gym, get a work out done, go the beach or head to the outdoors, and pick out a book!

I mean Bill Gates takes two whole weeks to himself to do nothing but read. I’m only suggesting that you read a whole day, which isn’t much compared to one of the richest man alive.

Here are recommendations on what to read this Leap day in one sitting along with a link to the ebook, because your time is precious and you need that book now!

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Pop Culture

35 Pictures of Celebrities Reading

There is a belief that if celebrities do it, you should too. If the cool kids are doing it, you should too. This is me telling you to follow the example of these celebrities.

This also me show casing rare pictures of celebrities reading, a sight you never see, but a sight you should see.

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Reading Tips & Tricks

The Ongoing Struggle of Reading Books in A Digital Era (video)

Above is a must watch documentary by Max Joseph, the star from MTV hit series “Catfish,” where Max tackles the idea of reading in a digital era. In this documentary he travels across the world to bookstores and interviews many different people on how to read in the era. This documentary was extremely interesting and insightful. This is a must watch video for all book lovers. Enjoy!