The Hill We Climb: Is This Book Really Worth Purchasing? | Book Review

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Genre: Poetry

In Case You Don’t Know:

This book contains the infamous poem that was read in Joe Biden’s inauguration by the youngest poet ever to perform in American history. At 22 years old, Amanda Gorman expressed what we felt as a country during the exchange of power.

The Million Dollar Question: Is This Book Worth it?

Before I dive into the book review, I believe it’s important to analyze the purpose of this book release. This book contains nothing new than what was performed on television. Yes, it includes a foreword by Oprah Winfrey, but it’s nothing special. Her essay is 5 pages long and nothing in that was impactful. The poem in this book was stretched out to 18 pages, but the effect of every page is impactful. THAT serves a purpose. Other than that, this book is clearly a money grab.

This book costs $15.99 at suggest retail, or $9.59 on Amazon. This book wasn’t published on paperback, it’s hardcover allowed book publishers to ask for a premium on a 32 page book.

This book is a clear money grab for a book that has one poem, published two months after the inauguration, and with no exclusive content by the author.

In case you can’t tell, this book is not worth the purchase of $10. It’s a beautiful poem that should be read for everyone and by everyone, but with author margins being so low, this book only supports the publishing industry.

If you want to read this poem you can access it here for free.

But You Know Why I’m Obsessed With The Idea of This Book?

I love this book because it reminds me of Thomas Paine’s Common Sense. The Hill We Climb reminds me of Eighteenth Century America when writers would perform their speeches in front of crowds, and then spread the word in pamphlets.

The Hill We Climb is basically modern day’s Common Sense. Just like Common Sense, this book is talked about everywhere, and is sold and bought everywhere.

I’ve seen this book in bookstores, airports, grocery stores, and even at Burlington Coat Factory.

And this book is deserving of this recognition.

My Review

This book is beautiful. Performed two weeks after the terrorist attacks at our capital, our country clearly divided, at the heart of the tension during the transition of power: this poem clearly spoke what we were feeling at that moment.

This poem did three things: expressed, reflected, and inspired.

Expressed

It expressed how scared, and nervous we were into the future we were looking into.

When day comes, we ask ourselves: Where can we find light In this never-ending shade? The loss we carry, a sea we must wade.

Reflected

It reflected on the America we call home, from the perspective of a POC.

And yes, we are far from polished,
far from pristine. But this doesn’t mean we’re striving to
form a union that is perfect. We are striving to forge our union with
purpose

Inspired

And it most most importantly, inspired to be better Americans.

Because we know to put  Our future first, we must first  Put our differences aside.

This poem is beautiful. It’s worth the read, but not worth the purchase. For the same price, you can get a fully developed novel rather than just one poem.

Despite the book only having one poem, I still give this book five stars. I don’t blame the author for this, I blame the publishing industry. The publishing industry used this poem as an opportunity to earn more money. Am I surprised? No, publishing houses do this all the time. But that discussion is for another blog post.

Favorite Quotes

We close the divide, Because we know to put  Our future first, we must first  Put our differences aside.

Let the globe, if nothing else, say this is true:  That even as we grieved, we grew, That even as we hurt, we hoped, That even as we tired, we tried. That we’ll forever be tied together

Let the globe, if nothing else, say this is true:  That even as we grieved, we grew, That even as we hurt, we hoped, That even as we tired, we tried. That we’ll forever be tied together.

enjoy

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